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How to generate PWM Pulse in MATLAB

How to generate PWM Pulse in MATLAB | PWM Pulse Generation in MATLAB | MATLAB Tutorial To generate a PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) pulse in MATLAB, follow these steps:

1. Define the frequency of the PWM signal (e.g., freq = 1 hz).

2. Set the duty cycle of the pulse (e.g., dutyCycle = 0.5 for 50% duty cycle).

3. Create a time vector for the duration of the signal (e.g., time = 0:1/(freq*10):1).

4. Generate the PWM signal using the 'square' waveform function (e.g., pwmSignal = square(2*pi*freq*time, dutyCycle*100)). 5. Plot the PWM signal (e.g., plot(time, pwmSignal)) to visualize the pulse.


Title: Generating Periodic Impulses in MATLAB for Pulse Width Modulation (PWM)

Introduction: In this tutorial, we'll explore how to generate periodical impulses in MATLAB, which are often used for Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) control in various applications. Pulse Width Modulation is a crucial technique used in controlling converters, motors, and other systems. We'll use MATLAB to create these impulses, and we'll cover two methods using triangular and sawtooth waveforms.

Prerequisites:

Before we delve into generating periodical impulses, make sure you have MATLAB installed and set up on your computer.

Method 1: Using Triangular Waveform

  1. Open MATLAB and access the Simulink Library Browser.

  2. Navigate to Simulink > Power Systems > Specialized Technology > Fundamental Blocks > Control and Measurements.

  3. Select the "Triangle Generator" block, which generates a triangular waveform.

  4. Configure the frequency and phase angle of the triangular waveform as needed.

  5. Add a "Constant" block to set the duty cycle. A duty cycle of 1 represents 100%, 0.5 represents 50%, and 0 represents 0%.

  6. Use a "Relational Operator" block to compare the triangular waveform and the duty cycle.

  7. When the triangular waveform is greater than the duty cycle value, the output will be 1, indicating the pulse is active.

  8. Connect the blocks as per the logic mentioned above.

  9. Use a scope to visualize the results.

  10. Simulate the model to generate the periodical impulses.

You can adjust the duty cycle to control the pulse width. A duty cycle of 0.5 will result in a 50% duty cycle, and so on. The output will represent the generated pulse.

Method 2: Using Sawtooth Waveform

  1. Follow the same steps as above to open MATLAB and access the Simulink Library Browser.

  2. Select the "Sawtooth Generator" block, which generates a sawtooth waveform.

  3. Configure the frequency and phase angle as needed.

  4. Use a "Constant" block to set the duty cycle, ensuring it's within the range of 0 to 1.

  5. Apply the same logic with the "Relational Operator" block as in Method 1.

  6. Connect the blocks accordingly.

  7. Use a scope to visualize the results.

  8. Simulate the model to generate the periodical impulses.


Remember that the amplitude of the triangular and sawtooth waveforms is limited to -1 to +1. Adjusting the duty cycle will determine the pulse width.

Conclusion:

Generating periodical impulses in MATLAB is essential for various applications, especially in converter control. By utilizing either triangular or sawtooth waveforms, you can control the duty cycle and produce the desired pulses. Experiment with different duty cycle values to achieve the pulse width modulation required for your specific project.

Thank you for reading this tutorial on generating periodical impulses in MATLAB. If you found this information helpful, please subscribe to our channel and click the notification bell for updates on upcoming tutorials. If you have any questions or need further assistance, feel free to reach out.


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